THE CO-MISSION FELLOWSHIPS PROGRAM

Two Co-MISSION Fellows as selected annually. These commissions are granted to individual artists who are Chicago based and have received significant awards, residencies and/or accolades for their creative work over the course of their careers. The program is specifically designed to partner with artists who have already completed the initial research and development phase of a new work and are looking for intensive support around the completion and premiere of a new project.


The Program offers:
Six months of rehearsal space in the Links Hall studios from January-June
A stipend of $500 per month over the course of the residency ($3,000 total)
Support of the The Art of Rehearsal Coaching program.
A discretionary stipend to contract a production manager, PR consultant, or dramaturg. ($400 stipend for 20 hours at $20 an hour)
An intensive technical workshop
Free access to performances and discussions at Links Hall
A public works-in-progress showing within the first two months of the Fellowship.
Professional development guidance in marketing and finance from Links Hall’s Staff.
Fiscal Sponsorship at Links Hall for any additional financial needs of the Fellowship Project.
A two-week run at Links Hall to premier the performance in the final two weeks of February.


This is provided in exchange of the artist’s commitment to

Maintain the rehearsal space by wiping down the dance floor at every rehearsal.
Volunteer for several Box Office, and/or front-of-house shifts for Links Hall performances prior to or during their residency.
Join in on Links Hall activities and help out based on their individual skill sets.
Manage their rehearsal schedules.
Utilize the resources of the residency. i.e, rehearse, work with their dramaturge, participate in workshops, be responsive to marketing, scheduling, and production staff inquires.
Credit Links Hall as a commissioner of the work in future presentations.
Fellowships are awarded by Links Hall’s Programing Committee Co-Chaired by Cheryl Lynn Bruce and Julia Mayer.
Calls For proposals take place in the winter and selections are announced in June.

2019 CO-MISSION FELLOWS

Silvita Profile
Meida

Silvita Diaz Brown | Legendas y Realidades

The research for my Links Hall Fellowship is to delve into my heritage through Mexican mythology and its teachings to create a new dance work: Leyendas y Realidades. Leyendas y Realidades will celebrate my Mexican heritage, my adopted country and awaken insights about gender equality, female strength and social justice through myths translated into movement, sound, and costume. The work will develop as dance vignettes capturing the essence of the myths to manifest current matters in our system but with a touch of mysticism and Mexican folklore.

Silvita Diaz Brown is a Mexican/American choreographer, dancer, actor, acrobat, yogi and yoga instructor established in Chicago since 2008. She is the founder of Sildance/AcroDanza Company. Her work interlaces dance imagery, partner acrobatics, ritual gesture and spoken word. Her work investigates the self by exploring her own roots, desires and fears and how they relate to our existing world and our communities and social issues. Silvita is passionate about creating dances that are based on life’s journey experiences. Her work attempts to reach all as evolving beings. Silvita has been privileged to work with diverse communities of artists internationally. Her choreography has been presented at various venues and festivals in Delhi, Toronto, Chicago, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, and various locations in Mexico; including Puebla and Mexico City. This summer 2018 Sildance/AcroDanza has been invited to perform in Spain. Silvita is very excited and grateful to be part of Links Hall through the Links Hall artists Co-Mission Fellowship 2018-2019.

Meida Teresa McNeal | Fifth City revisited/Imaginal Politics embodied

In homage to her parents and Chicago’s Westside, McNeal charts new ground for a solo-facilitated work, “Fifth City revisited/Imaginal Politics embodied.” An ambitious community redevelopment process for Chicago’s Westside, the Fifth City Human Development Project incorporated educational curriculum, economic development, skill training, creativity, and community investment. Fifth City presented a powerful model for local citizens reimagining their own community and working together to manifest a new vision to bring a higher quality of life for all. What can we draw from the historic example of Fifth City’s ambitious plan to rebuild a Westside community using the available archive as both a blueprint and evidence of a failed experiment in community transformation? What moments of ingenious community design can we draw from Fifth City to imagine community revitalization and mobilization for our 21st century reality? Drawing on annual reports, business directories, curriculum, as well as oral histories, this project invites people to consider Fifth City’s plans, symbols, and rituals for community transformation as part of an active creative community process that results in a performance with an accompanying installation.

Meida Teresa McNeal is an Independent Artist, Educator, Administrator, and Scholar whose work lay at the intersection of performance studies, dance and critical ethnography. She received her PhD in Performance Studies from Northwestern University and her MFA in Choreography & Dance History from Ohio State University. Meida is the Director of Honey Pot Performance, an Afro-feminist collective dedicated to critical performance & public humanities. Over the past two decades, Meida has produced numerous creative projects as both a solo artist and with Honey Pot Performance, with works performed in Illinois, Rhode Island, Ohio, California, and Trinidad. She has taught courses in dance, critical performance ethnography, and black diasporic cultural production at Northwestern University, Brown University, Governors State, and Columbia College Chicago. Meida also works with the Chicago Park District as Arts & Culture Manager supporting community arts partnerships, youth arts, cultural stewardship, and civic engagement initiatives across the city’s parks and cultural centers.